eagle-i University of Alaska FairbanksUniversity of Alaska Fairbanks

Laboratories at University of Alaska Fairbanks

This is a summary list of all laboratories at University of Alaska Fairbanks . The list includes links to more detailed information, which may also be found using the eagle-i search app.

D. O'Brien Laboratory



Drew Laboratory

Summary:

Research in the Drew lab focuses on three aspects of hibernation biology. The first involves mechanisms of intrinsic neuroprotective properties of Arctic ground squirrel brain in the hibernating and euthermic state. The second involves mechanisms and cognitive significance of synaptic remodeling observed during hibernation torpor and arousal. The third involves central nervous system regulation of metabolic suppression in hibernation.



Harris Laboratory

Summary:

The primary focus of my research is to determine the necessity and sufficiency of serotonergic processes within the brainstem in controlling breathing, the functional consequences of brainstem serotonergic deficits, and the potential for such deficits to contribute to pathophysiologies such as SIDS. This work is directed at understanding the basic essential mechanisms of respiratory control, and will contribute to the development of diagnostic tests and therapeutic strategies to reduce the occurrence of SIDS.

In addition, I am interested in the integration of sensory inputs in the control of breathing, the evolutionary origin of mechanisms controlling air breathing in vertebrates, the control of metabolism, and the evolution and physiological adaptations associated with states of reduced metabolism such as mammalian heterothermy (hibernation and torpor). This research program promotes both a basic understanding of physiological and neurophysiological processes important to homeostatic regulation, as well as knowledge with direct and critical biomedical applications related to respiratory neuropathologies such as the Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.



Hueffer Laboratory



Large Animal Research Station

Summary:

LARS is managed by the Institute of Arctic Biology at the University of Alaska Fairbanks to provide a unique facility for research and education that focuses on ungulates from the subarctic and arctic.

Visitors of all ages can safely observe some of our animals on a summer tour and talk to one our guides about the biology of life in the north.

Researchers and instructors can contact us to plan experiments and classes in our barns, pens, pastures and natural areas for biology, ecology, physiology and behavior.

Students can contact us about jobs and research experiences in one of our projects.



Runstadler Laboratory



Taylor Laboratory

Summary:

My research interests center around mechanisms by which exogenous metabolites (nutriceuticals and toxins) influence neural function. I am the Principal Investigator for two research programs derived from this interest. One investigates the influence of nicotine and alcohol on development, dysfunction and plasticity in control of breathing by neural networks of the vertebrate brainstem. Another research program investigates the beneficial influence of phytochemicals and detrimental effects of alcohol on mechanosensory and locomotory neurons and networks as modeled by transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans. Each research programs addresses Alaska-relevant health issues and serves as training arenas for postdoctoral fellows and graduate as well as undergraduate students.



Wildlife Toxicology Laboratory



Found 8   laboratories .

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